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Teacup Pug: Is This The Right Pug For You?

Teacup Pug: Is This The Right Pug For You?

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Pugs are simply incredible; Teacup Pugs are even more spectacular!

There’s a lot of controversy behind these teensy tiny dogs. Is it okay to breed them? Do they have severe health problems? How do you even raise a Teacup Pug?

There are a lot of questions regarding Teacup Pugs and their upbringing. I’ll do my best to help you get to know this tiny pooch better.

By the end of this article, you’ll be ready to decide whether the Teacup Pug or Toy Pug is the ideal pet for you!

Are you ready to meet these adorable little paws?

What Is A Teacup Pug?

teacup pug leaning on a mug

Photo from: @daisypugs_

For the past twenty years or so, designer dog breeds have been all the rage. They’re still highly in demand, and I don’t see their popularity declining in the near future. No, I’m not a psychic. I just understand how things really are.

Let’s admit it: designer breeds can be pawmazing family dogs! They’re often bred for their pleasant temperament, easy-going approach, and some special features such as hypoallergenic coats.

I can’t blame breeders for wanting to achieve these characteristics.

But, I do blame breeders for wanting to achieve a certain size or appearance at the expense of a dog’s health.

Sadly, teacup dogs are a part of the mentioned breeding practice.

So, what is a Teacup Pug?

A Teacup Pug is just a normal dog within the Pug breed, but it’s reduced in size due to genetic manipulation while breeding.

Usually, breeders pick the runts of the litter and breed them to achieve a small size.

Now you know that the Teacup Pug isn’t a breed of its own. It’s only a size variation of the normal Pug. But does it have the same personality traits? We know it’s not the same in size, but what about other physical features? We’re about to find that out!

Where Do Teacup Pugs Come From And How To Breed Them?

teacup pug dog sitting on the carpet

Photo from: @lolatheteacuppug

Originally, Pugs are dogs from China. They became popular across the world for their smushy faces, happy-go-lucky temperament, and overall unique appearance. They’re purebred dogs that are approved by the official Kennel Club (AKC).

However, Teacup Pugs are not purebred dogs. Some dog experts even claim that Teacup Pugs are the result of breeding Pugs and teacup Chihuahuas together to get little Chug puppies.

Still, Chihuahua mixes are a whole different story, and you should know how to tell apart Chugs and Teacup Pugs.

Teacup Pug puppies are a result of breeding litter runts or dogs suffering from dwarfism together . Also, you can breed a normal-sized Pug with a dwarf Pug or a small version to get a teacup.

The tiny size is achieved throughout the continuous breeding of smaller than average dogs.

It’s hard to tell when the first Teacup Pugs appeared. It’s only natural to assume these dogs existed quite a while ago because people did not think about what would happen if two significantly smaller dogs were bred together.

The first purposely bred Teacup Pugs occurred some twenty years ago. The turn of the last century was the period when many designer dog breeds started being produced massively.

We got the ultimate family pooch, the Goldendoodle (Golden Retriever and Poodle mix), as well as other crossbreed canines whose popularity became so strong they’re even starting to be considered as a breed of their own.

Sadly, many breeders are using manipulation to get Teacup Pugs. That’s absolutely wrong since they’re purposely breeding dogs with genetic problems to get more puppies with the same issues.

It’s extremely hard to find a Teacup Pug free from any conditions, as well as from a reputable breeder that cares about the dog’s well-being. But, more on that later. Now, we’ll discuss the controversy behind breeding teacups.

Why Is Breeding Teacup Dogs So Controversial?

a man holding teacup pug in hands

Photo from: @sistad_303

We live in an age when everything can become a trend, no matter if it’s a good or bad thing. Breeding teacup dogs just for fun and their small size has become a trend too.

However, true dog lovers shouldn’t pick dogs based only on their appearance and should always think long-term when getting a dog.

Let’s take any teacup dog as an example. Sure, they might feel fine at first. They might even be free from genetic conditions for the first couple of months. But, you never know when something might turn up.

Your once healthy Teacup Pug can turn into an ill doggy overnight. And who is to blame?

Well, the fault is both yours and the breeder’s. Yours for supporting unethical breeding in the first place, and the breeder’s for conducting the practice purposely while knowing how dangerous it might be for the dog’s health.

Abusive Breeding

What really blew my mind is abusive breeding. Back when I was a kid, we never heard of such breeding. My parents used to have dogs my entire life, and not once did someone mention abusive breeding.

So, you can only imagine my surprise when I found out what that is.

Abusive breeding is an approach to breeding that starves the dog so their growth is stunted.

Let’s say you’re breeding a Boerboel. Imagine ignoring the Boerboel’s normal growth chart and starving them so they stay small and then produce even smaller puppies!

Sure, Boerboels are large dogs and their pups may not be as small as Teacup Pugs, but you can see where I’m headed.

Now, imagine starving a Pug enough that a regular Pug turns into a small Pug. Those puppies would be extremely tiny!

Moreover, those pups, along with their parents, would be unhealthy and suffer from severe malfunctions.

I heard that some celebrities support this practice by buying fashionable puppies from abusive breeders. I don’t believe they even know what they’re doing. Once again, we come to the matter of picking looks over inner beauty.

What’s more beautiful than a healthy dog?

What Do Teacup Pugs Look Like?

a black teacup pug playing with plastic balls

Photo from: @peggie.the.pug

They’re pawdorable. They’re tiny. They’re to die for!

Yup, they’re Teacup Pugs! Imagine a teensy tiny version of a Pug, with all its usual features.

But, let’s stop for a moment to discuss what Pugs are like.

For starters, we’ll discuss their size.

Normal Pugs usually weigh around 14 to 18 pounds, while they stand at around 11 inches tall at the withers. They’re a part of the small dog breed group used as companions.

Teacup Pugs are a toy breed, hence why we also call them Toy Pugs. However, they’re significantly smaller than any of the pups from the AKC’s toy group.

This toy dog never weighs more than 5 pounds. That’s really tiny!

As far as their height is concerned, Teacup Pugs never grow to past 6 inches. The reason why people call teacups teacups is because they can fit into a teacup comfortably.

Don’t tell me you’ve never seen tiny Pugs, Chis, or teacup Yorkies posing in a large teacup?

Now, that we have the size figured out, let’s move on to the physical features.

Physical Features Of A Teacup Pug

Teacup Pugs don’t have different physical features other than their size. They look pretty much the same as standard Pugs.

Puppies usually start with dark blue eyes that will turn a shade of brown as they age. So, we can say that the signature eye color of Pugs is brown.

Another signature sign of Pugs is the black mask on their face and black ears. The coloration of these body parts may change its intensity during the growing-up process.

Pugs come in different coat colors. Some light-coated pups may have a dark line going down their back but all black Pugs don’t have it.

Since there are several interesting Pug colors, I suggest we go in-depth about them. Teacup Pugs can appear in any known Pug color. Keep in mind that the American Kennel Club recognizes only fawn and solid black Pugs.

Other colors are not approved, but neither is our Teacup Pug, so…

Fawn Teacup Pug

This is definitely the signature coat color of all Pugs.

Fawn, as the most common coat option, is characterized by a light coat with black markings. Pugs have black masks on their brachycephalic muzzles. Also, this coat color may exhibit the black trace down the dog’s back.

Fawn Teacup Pugs are absolutely adorable, but I know the next coat color will get lots of compliments too.

Black Teacup Pug

Black Teacup Pugs are blessed with only one coat. On the other hand, fawn Teacup Pugs have a double coat which sheds more.

Lately, black Pugs are becoming more popular due to their low-shedding qualities. But, you have to admit, they’re quite stunning too.

Black Teacup Pugs come in jet black, but they can also have white markings on their chest and paws. Still, the markings are not too big and appear only as occasional spots.

Brindle Teacup Pugs

Brindle Teacup Pugs are not that common, but since these dogs are being bred under questionable practices, brindle is still possible.

We’re used to seeing other dogs with brindle coats, e.g. Bulldogs, but not Pugs.

Brindle means the coat will appear to be striped, usually, with dark stripes on a fawn coat. To get this coat color, you’ll need lots of genetic manipulation.

White Teacup Pugs

I don’t want to recommend this Teacup Pug because they’re bordering on being albino dogs.

White Teacup Pugs have white coats because of a lack of melanin. Also, they’re often the result of terrible breeding practices.

Temperament: What Are Teacup Pugs Really Like?

a teacup pug lying in the bed

Photo from: @mooeeeyyy

The Pug dog is an absolute delight to own. But, there is a noticeable difference between male and female Pugs. Females tend to be more reserved than their male counterparts.

On the other hand, male Pugs can be a bit mischievous. Still, they don’t mean any harm: they just want to have fun!

The Pug’s clownish behavior puts them on the list of some of the finest family pets.

Unfortunately, we can’t say the same about our teensy tiny buddy here. No matter how wonderful these little pups are, they still can’t adapt to all lifestyles.

All pugs enjoy showing affection. Before adopting one into a family with different generations, you should take some things into consideration.

No matter how sweet a Teacup Pug is, there’s always an issue of their adaptability to homes with kids and pets.

How about we see what Teacup Pugs are like with big families and other animals?

Teacup Pugs And Families

I’ve never seen a smaller dog with a bigger attitude! Sure, we have lots of other teacup dog breeds, but rarely do any of them have as wacky a personality as the Teacup Pug. I mean, it’s written all over their flat faces how hilarious these dogs are!

Teacup Pugs share the same personality as normal Pugs. They’re very loyal and happy dogs that love to spend time with their owners. Overall, they have a lovely nature when they’re around people.

However, the question of whether Pugs are good with families is not determined by their personality. It’s more an issue of their size.

You see, Pugs are really tiny and thus have fragile bones. They don’t do well on stairs, and they don’t need strenuous exercise. On one hand, that’s okay if you don’t have lots of free time to take them out.

On the other hand, I wouldn’t recommend Teacup Pugs to families with small children. Kids still need to learn how to handle tiny dogs, and even if they know what’s wrong and what’s not, they can still drop the puppy unintentionally.

Also, rough play is a big NO, so keep that in mind.

I’d say Teacup Pugs can fit into families with larger kids, preferably teens. These small dogs need someone that will be careful around them, not someone that could accidentally stomp on them.

Teacup Pugs And Other Pets

The same thing applies to Teacup Pugs living with other pets. These extra tiny versions of Pugs may get along with other pets, but the question here is whether other pets will get along with Teacup Pugs!

Thanks to their extremely small size, Teacup Pugs can easily be injured by larger dogs. Imagine having a Great Dane and a

Teacup Pug in the same house. That’s a tragedy in the making. Even though Great Danes are gentle giants that would not intentionally hurt anyone, they could still hurt your Pug.

Teacup Pugs are so fragile that they don’t need a lot of pressure to injure their little bones.

Also, living with a dog with strong herding needs is a huge no. Australian Shepherds, Siberian Huskies, or even Terriers can think of Teacup Pugs as their prey and could hunt them around the house.

Simply put, if you already have dogs living with you, maybe getting a Teacup Pug is not a good idea. I’d consider another small dog breed if I were you. Perhaps a dog that’s not too small and not too big, but right in the middle is the one for you!

Lifespan: How Long Do Toy Pugs Live?

a black teacup pug in a mug on a table

Photo from: @boris_pugpreto

As we can figure out based on their breeding practice, Teacup Pugs can’t brag about a long lifespan. In fact, it’s not even the same as with regular Pugs or miniature Pugs.

Lots of factors can impact a dog’s lifespan. One of the biggest reasons is something that we, as Pug owners, can’t control – genetics.

If you take into consideration the manner by which Teacup Pugs are being bred, you can only assume they won’t live for too long.

On average, a Teacup Pug’s lifespan is 6 to 10 years. That’s significantly shorter than a regular Pug’s life span which is 12 to 15 years.

If dog owners knew about this short life expectancy, I bet the high demand for Teacup Pugs would simply disappear.

About 6 to 10 years is not enough when there are dog breeds that can live up to 16 incredible years! Common factors such as a poor choice of dog food, frequent health problems, stress, and lack of exercise can even make this lifespan shorter.

You’ll need to take good care of your Teacup Pug and be ready to face the fact your teacup might not live that long. It’s always hard to lose a pet, so if you can’t stand the chances of losing your teacup too early, don’t get one in the first place.

Healthy Or Not? The Most Common Conditions

a teacup pug in a purse at the vet

Photo from: @chloejo.thepug

It is time to address those notorious health problems all Teacup Pugs are facing. Trust me, it won’t be pleasant. These dogs are prone to lots of severe conditions. With regular vet checkups and treatments, you might ease their issues.

Still, I urge you to pick your breeder wisely. Don’t let someone fool you into buying a dog for a discounted price, because you’re highly likely to get a pooch suffering from life-threatening health conditions.

Now, let’s talk about Teacup Pugs and their health conditions!

Breathing Problems

Breathing problems are very common with Pugs.

You’ve probably heard a Pug snorting or breathing heavily. That’s because they’re brachycephalic dogs. In other words, their muzzle is shorter than with other dog breeds which causes heavy breathing and other breathing issues.

As far as the Teacup Pug is concerned, they’re even more prone to developing these health problems because their muzzles are even tinier.

Skin Problems

Pugs are known for having skin problems.

They’re all wrinkly and folded with a short coat. This can only mean one thing, they are a perfect ground for bacterial infections!

You must clean your Pug’s skin often to prevent infections from developing. Skin folds and rolls are a favorite place for bacteria to develop! Also, their ears are folded, which can also mean a fertile ground for infections.

Use special shampoos for Pugs and brush them with brushes designed to suit Pug’s coats if you want to avoid skin problems.

Hyperthyroidism

When a Teacup Pug suffers from hyperthyroidism, their metabolism slows down and they gain weight without changing their eating habits. Also, everything inside the pup seems to slow down, including their heart rate.

Dogs suffering from hyperthyroidism have high blood cholesterol.

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia means your Teacup Pug has low blood sugar levels. It’s crucial for these pups to maintain normal blood sugar levels, or you’re risking further health complications.

Patella Luxation

Patella Luxation means your dog is suffering from a sliding kneecap.

This is a painful condition that limits the dog’s mobility.

If you don’t treat Patella Luxation, it may lead to senior arthritis.

Osteogenesis Imperfecta

Here’s a health condition that’s highly common in Teacup Pugs.

Osteogenesis Imperfecta means your dog has brittle bones. This means you shouldn’t allow your Teacup Pug to perform strenuous exercises or spend time with bigger dogs. It only takes one second for a Teacup Pug to break a bone.

Pick dog food high in collagen and chondroitin for stronger bones and joints.

Entropion

Entropion means your Pug is suffering from an inward-rolled inner part of the eyelid. This is a painful condition quite common in Pugs. If you don’t treat it, it may lead to cornea damage and blindness.

Dental Problems

Dogs lose their baby teeth naturally. Their adult teeth grow at the age of six months. However, Teacup Pugs can’t go through this change on their own. their baby teeth simply won’t fall out.

That’s why you must visit the vet to have the teeth removed from their shortened jaw.

Taking Care Of The Toy Pug

a teacup pug lying on the lawn

Photo from: @anna.theologou

Teacup Pugs need extra special care. They’re not designed to live like normal-sized dogs. They’re gentle, fragile, and prone to developing severe health problems.

If you want to own a Teacup Pug, you should be ready to make that pup’s life heaven on Earth. They only live for a short period of time, so let’s make their lives wonderful!

First, you’ll need to find the best food for your Pug. I recommend you consult your vet for guidelines on feeding a teacup.

Of course, every dog needs its own accessories and items around the house. Not to forget, toys too!

Luckily, PupVine loves Teacup Pugs and has some pretty pawesome recommendations for you and your Pug.

Check out our lists of:

Best pug toys

Comfiest beds designed for Pugs

and useful harnesses and fashionable collars for Teacup Pugs!

What’s The Price Of A Teacup Pug?

a teacup pug sitting on the couch and looking into camera

Photo from: @lolatheteacuppug

When getting a teacup dog, you must realize that its size dictates the price. Teacup dogs and other miniature canines like

Pomeranians are highly in demand. It’s only natural for their price to jump way up, compared to a German Shepherd, for example.

A GSD’s price is relatively affordable since they’re so common. Small and popular dog breeds, such as our Teacup Pug or even teacup Poms, can cost a pretty penny.

However, this is not because one dog breed is more important than the other. All dogs have their value.

It’s a matter of trend. Owning teacup dogs and showing them on social media like Instagram is the IN THING right now. Many teacup dogs have become superstars of the online world.

To sum it up, teacup dogs, including Teacup Pugs are extremely in demand and thus have a hefty price tag.

On average, Teacup Pugs will be listed for around $4,000. Special colors or pups from popular breeders will cost several thousand more! Regular Pugs cost way less!

Unfortunately, in this case, price does not equal quality. Teacups are often carriers of numerous health problems. Before you decide to hand over a hefty amount of money, think everything through thoroughly.

Is having a teacup dog really worth it? Would you give someone so much money just to get a puppy with questionable health status?

Also, that’s only the initial purchase price. Vet bills for the first year can add up to $1,000, not to mention the much-needed doggy accessories from Amazon!

Be careful who you trust with your Teacup Pug. There are a lot of scammers out there, selling Chugs as Teacup Pugs for the same price.

More on finding a good Pug breeder (if there even is one) down below.

Where To Get A Teacup Pug?

teacup pug standing in the garden among flowers

Photo from: @lolatheteacuppug

Toy Pugs or Teacup Pugs aren’t as common as you might think. Sure, they’re in demand, but it’s not easy to find a good breeder.

I urge you to do thorough research. There are lots of scammers wanting to take advantage of you. Usually, they’ll list Chugs as teacups and earn money that way because Chugs are less expensive than Teacup Pugs.

Once you notice the difference, it’s already too late.

Finding a reliable breeder is always a hard thing to do. You need someone with a good breeding practice that follows ethical principles.

A good breeder puts the dog’s needs first. They submit the dogs to regular examinations and screenings, making sure all their canines are free from any health conditions, hereditary or otherwise.

If a breeder has OFA and PennHIP certificates for their pups, they’re a keeper. Other health tests are another pawesome bonus!

A clear sign you can trust a breeder is the health guarantee they’re offering. Claiming a pup is free from diseases for a year, two, or even more, and having proof of it is incredibly valuable.

Look for all these traits in your chosen breeder.

I want to address something regarding advertisements for Teacup Pugs.

Scammers and unreliable breeders usually don’t have a professional approach, meaning they don’t have a website, they advertise in local media, and they sell for a ridiculously low price.

These are only some signs of people you shouldn’t trust.

Sadly, teacup dogs are often a sign of unethical practices. PupVine may not have top lists of Teacup Pug breeders, but we do have some reliable Pug breeders.

Also, check out Pug breeders in Maine, and Ontario’s Pug breeders. Maybe they’ll know where to find a teacup version of our beloved Pug!

Miniature Vs Teacup Pug: Are They Different At All?

miniature pug sitting on the road

Photo from: @darceydaisy2022

I bet you have already heard of miniature Pugs along with Teacup Pugs. Even though their name says they’re small dogs, they’re not the same as Teacup Pugs. In fact, there’s a significant difference between the two.

Miniature Pugs are not purebred Pugs. However, although teacup breeding is questionable, they still come from purebred Pug dogs. Miniatures are the result of breeding Pugs with teacup Chihuahuas.

They’re also called Chugs, Chughuahuas, and mini Pugs.

Mini Pugs look a lot like Teacup Pugs at birth. That’s why many scammers use this opportunity to sell pups while there aren’t noticeable differences between the two.

Once the pup starts to grow, the differences between them and teacups will emerge. For example, mini Pugs will be much taller than Teacup Pugs.

They may not have a breed standard, but due to their frequent breeding, dog experts have concluded that mini Pugs usually weigh from 10 to 20 pounds.

Also, these Pugs or Chugs stand tall at 6 to 12 inches at the withers.

Once you see a full-grown Chug, you’ll notice the big difference between them and teacups. Chugs seem like they have Chihuahua’s face stuck on Pug’s body. They have longer snouts and thin legs like a Chihuahua.

To recap, Teacup Pugs have flat muzzles, round heads, and floppy triangular ears.

To Sum Up…

So, how do you like our Teacup Pug? It’s pretty adorable, right?

Well, now you know what’s not adorable about these tiny dogs. Sadly, Teacup Pugs are one of those pooches with numerous health issues.

People believe it’s unethical to breed teacups because you’re intentionally breeding dogs with health problems.

I won’t tell you whether to get a Teacup Pug or not. That’s up to you to decide. But, if you do choose one, make sure you make their life wonderful!

Read Next: Teacup Miniature Dachshund – The 411 On The Tiniest Wiener Dog