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Dogo Argentino Vs. Cane Corso – Who Would Win?

Dogo Argentino Vs. Cane Corso – Who Would Win?

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Do you love strong, big dogs? If huge canines fascinate you, you are likely already familiar with some of the largest names, such as the Great Dane, Pitbull, German Shepherd, and Rottweiler.

But what about Dogo Argentino vs. Cane Corso? These two breeds seem to make everyone turn around for another look when they walk by the dog park!

Some might even confuse the two, although those familiar with these breeds will always know the most noticeable difference when it comes to the Dogo Argentino vs. Cane Corso: White and dark coat colors.

Other than their opposing fur colors, what other differences are there between these two large dog breeds? And which one would win in a smackdown? Which one makes a better family pet?

If you want to learn more about the differences between the Dogo Argentino vs. Cane Corso, keep on reading – we’ve got everything covered!

Difference Between Cane Corso And Dogo Argentino

black cane corso sitting outside

Once you scratch the surface, you’ll see that there are, in fact, many differences when it comes to the Dogo Argentino vs. Cane Corso.

Before we go into more detail, you can see a quick comparison in the chart below:

  Cane Corso Dogo Argentino
Height: 23.5–27.5 in 24–27 in
Weight: 90–120 lb 88–100 lb
Lifespan: 10–12 years9–15 year
Coat color: black, fawn, brindle, grey, redwhite
Temperament: calm, trainable, quiet, reservedfriendly, loyal, protective, affectionate

Dogo Argentino Vs. Cane Corso Origins

Dogo Argentino standing on grass looking away

While these pups look similar, they have quite different origins. Not only did they come from entirely opposite parts of the world, they even had different purposes!

History can shape a dog’s temperament and appearance at a much greater rate than most would expect. This is because we have shaped dog breeds in such a way to be able to fulfill a specific purpose, and this also influences their temperaments.

To be able to fully understand the Dogo Argentino vs. Cane Corso comparison, it’s important to understand the genetic and historical backgrounds of the two breeds.

This is the history behind them:

Dogo Argentino

As its name suggests, the Dogo Argentino originates from Argentina.

This isn’t an old breed. It was the result of deliberately crossbreeding the Old Fighting Dog of Cordoba breed and a few other large dog breeds (mostly Mastiff-type dogs), such as the Pyrenean Mastiff, Boxer, Bulldog, Great Dane, and the Bull Terrier.

This would result in a perfect fighting dog. As such, the breed is no older than the early 20th century. In fact, it was recognized for the first time in 1964 by the Argentine Kennel Club. The AKC didn’t recognize it until early 2020!

Cane Corso

The Cane Corso, unlike the Dogo Argentino, belongs to the Mollosus type dogs and is considered an ancient dog breed, even though the AKC only recognized the breed in 2010.

They originate from ancient Greece and the Roman Empire and were originally bred in Italy. As such, they are considered among the few native Italian breeds, which is why they are sometimes called Italian Mastiffs.

They were used as war dogs by the Romans, and once the wars stopped, they were used primarily for boar hunting but also as guard dogs and farm dogs.

Unfortunately, as people moved to cities, Cane Corso dogs almost went extinct by the mid-20th century. It wasn’t until the 1970s that the Cane Corso breed was once again recognized with the help of some breed enthusiasts.

This is around the same time that The Society Amorati Cane Corso (Society of Cane Corso Lovers) was founded, and the breed rose in popularity once again.

However, they weren’t widespread in the U.S. until the late 20th century and early 2000s.

Dogo Argentino Vs. Cane Corso Coat Color

cane corso standing outside with on house behind

The first thing that sets apart the Dogo Argentino vs. Cane Corso is coat color. As the breeds are fairly similar in appearance, it’s a good thing that there is this one simple thing that makes differentiating them effortless.

The Dogo Argentino is easily recognized by its white coat color. While the finest dogs of the breed have pure white coats, black spots are acceptable. However, the dominant color has to be white.

Cane Corso dogs, on the other hand, are much more colorful. While the most common Cane Corso color is black, they can come in a variety of other colors. Some of the recognized colors include fawn, grey, black and chestnut brindle, and red. Many can even be bicolored!

Both dogs have short coats that are effortless to brush and maintain but don’t provide too much protection against the cold. While they are rather resilient to cold weather, they still prefer warmer climates.

Dogo Argentino Vs. Cane Corso Size

Dogo Argentino and Cane Corso dogs are similar when it comes to appearance and size. Both are considered large dogs – in fact, they are two of the biggest dogs out there.

With an average height of 23.5–26 inches for females and 25–27.5 inches for males, Cane Corsos can grow to be slightly taller than Dogo Argentinos, which can reach the height of 24–25.5 inches for females and 24–25.5 inches for males.

The same could be said for their weight, as the Dogo Argentino rarely grows to be heavier than 100 pounds, while it isn’t uncommon for Cane Corsos to reach 120 pounds or even more!

Dogo Argentino Vs. Cane Corso Lifespan

Dogo Argentino running outside

Large dogs aren’t known for having a long lifespan. Quite the opposite – many large canines are known to live rather short lives.

There are several reasons behind this, but the most common one seems to be genetics. Large puppies grow and develop at a much faster pace compared to small breeds.

Unfortunately, rapid cell growth is connected to an increased risk of cancer. Not just that, but fast-growing bones and larger weight are connected with many orthopedic issues that can become so severe that many dog owners decide to euthanize their pets.

Fortunately, both the Dogo Argentino and Cane Corso live fairly long for dogs of their size. We’ll go over some of the common health issues that can influence their lifespan:

Cane Corso Lifespan

Cane Corsos are a relatively healthy breed. This is mostly because they aren’t the result of quick human design and have instead existed for centuries.

Still, there are some health conditions it would be smart to be wary of. This includes eye problems, hip dysplasia, and demodectic mange.

However, most dangerously, Cane Corsos are at risk of gastric torsion, also known as bloat. This is a dangerous health condition that, if left untreated, can kill your pooch in a matter of hours. Choosing the best quality dog food can help reduce the risk of this issue.

This is why it’s essential to buy your dog from a reputable Cane Corso breeder who ensures their dogs are tested for a range of genetic conditions. If a dog is healthy, it can usually live 10–12 years.

Dogo Argentino Lifespan

On average, Dogo Argentino dogs live longer than the Cane Corso breed. However, they are still prone to bloat, which is the main cause of death in adult dogs.

Some other health conditions that the Dogo Argentino might be prone to include autoimmune thyroiditis, hip dysplasia, and many other orthopedic issues.

At the same time, Dogo Argentino dogs are prone to many conditions connected with their white coat color. This includes eye problems, deafness, as well as an inclination to allergies.

If you buy your Dogo Argentino from a reputable breeder, it might live up to 15 years!

Cane Corso Vs. Dogo Argentino Temperament

cane corso sitting on ground

When it comes to temperament, there aren’t many things that set the dogs apart. Both make great watchdogs and personal protection dogs, and if you look at their history, this shouldn’t come as a surprise.

However, at the same time, it’s important to take some things into consideration.

Cane Corsos were bred to be war dogs, while Dogo Argentinos were originally bred for fighting pits. As such, both pups require proper socialization to avoid possible incidents with strangers. At the same time, they are extremely loyal to their owners.

Both breeds are devoted, loving, caring, and affectionate, and they can be excellent with kids if you socialize them in time. However, to make sure you get the best out of the breed, you need to know how to handle such large dogs.

Are Cano Corso Friendly?

The Cane Corso can be docile and affectionate, and this even includes their behavior towards children. However, this requires extensive socialization and obedience training from an early age.

While they have high energy levels that need to be properly depleted, they have calm temperaments and are not considered overly active while at home.

As long as they feel confident and are surrounded by owners who are not afraid of them, Cane Corsos can make great family pets – although you have to remain firm and strict to make sure they are obedient.

If socialized properly, they can be great family companions and do very well even around other pets. They know how to differentiate threats from everyday situations and will rarely act without being provoked first.

Are Cane Corso Dogs Dangerous?

Due to their history, Cane Corso dogs can have an aggressive streak, especially toward strangers. They are protective dogs that won’t allow anything to harm their owners.

This, combined with their great size, is the reason they require such extensive socialization. They need to know the boundaries and when they can behave a certain way. They have a somewhat bossy nature and need to learn their place.

Leaving a Cane Corso unsocialized can result in problems, as they are powerful canines that can cause serious harm with their bites.

However, according to the breed standard, a well-tempered Cane Corso should be indifferent when someone approaches him and, as his ancestors were a working breed, can handle a high amount of stress.

If a Cane Corso cannot stay calm in stressful situations, he is considered to have a behavioral flaw. No reputable breeder will sell you the offspring of such dogs.

Are Dogo Argentino Friendly?

Dogo Argentino standing in woods

Compared to the somewhat calmer Cane Corso, Dogo Argentino dogs are much more aloof yet friendly. They are cheerful dogs that, if properly trained, can make amazing family companions.

Dogo Argentinos tend to be good with children, as long as they are properly socialized. However, as they are strong dogs, you should never leave them alone with kids unsupervised.

They can be protective and somewhat suspicious of strangers, which is why you’d want to socialize them from an early age.

Also, they can be rather unfriendly towards smaller pets and other dogs due to their high prey drive and territorial behavior. They were bred to be fighting dogs, which is why they have to get used to other pets from an early age.

Are Dogo Argentino Dogs Dangerous?

Unfortunately, the Dogo Argentino is considered by many to be one of the most aggressive and dangerous dog breeds, especially when it comes to same-sex aggression.

However, we would like to add an important disclaimer: It all comes down to how you train them and where you buy your dog from.

A proper breeder will make sure the dog’s parents are well-tempered and friendly, which will lower the chances of your Dogo Argentino puppy ever growing up to develop behavioral problems.

If you train and socialize your dog properly and from an early age, your dog will learn not to behave aggressively. While they have a strong temperament, they are eager to please and love their humans with all their hearts.

As long as you know how to keep them under control and socialize them, they won’t be any more dangerous or aggressive than any other dog breed. However, if you let them become out of control, they can cause serious harm due to their strong size.

Which One Is The Better Guard Dog?

dog playing outside in grass

The ability to be a good guard dog comes from a few factors. A dog has to be protective enough to know when it’s time to stand up for its territory and owners. This also means that the pup shouldn’t be too friendly, as a good guard dog won’t want to be friends with anyone that walks into your property uninvited.

When it comes to Dogo Argentino vs. Cane Corso, both dog breeds fulfill these criteria. However, there are two other things that need to be mentioned: intelligence and trainability.

A good guard dog has to be intelligent yet obedient, as this will help them learn commands faster. However, intelligence combined with an independent and stubborn temperament can make a canine want to do things their own way.

Both the Cane Corso and Dogo Argentino are fairly good for this task. They are strong-willed dogs that are highly intelligent yet always want to make their owners happy. As such, they respond best to experienced owners who are consistent and firm.

Both breeds respond well to positive reinforcements, although Cane Corso seems to be a bit more submissive and sensitive. While this makes them more eager to obey, it also means you have to be very careful with training, as yelling can make them shut down and not want to participate anymore.

Still, both breeds make excellent guard dogs and are big and strong enough to deter an intruder from coming into your home uninvited. Just make sure to give them enough mental stimulation to ensure they don’t become bored, as this can lead to behavioral issues.

Which One Is Stronger?

beautiful dog standing outside looking away

Both dog breeds are incredibly strong due to their build and size. In fact, they were occasionally used as hunting dogs to hunt animals such as mountain lions and boars! This alone should tell you enough about their strength.

However, if you’re looking to get the ultimate dog, you need to take many things into consideration, such as agility, speed, as well as bite force.

When it comes to the first two, Cane Corso seems to be the winner. This dog was bred for many purposes, including hunting and war, and as such, it had to be as agile as possible.

In fact, some Cane Corsos have been reported to run as fast as 32 miles per hour! This is much faster than the Dogo Argentino, a breed that is estimated to not be able to run faster than 25 miles per hour.

However, both breeds are excellent jumpers and can jump up to 6 feet!

How Much Bite Force Does A Cane Corso Have?

The Cane Corso is a dog with one of the strongest bites out there. In fact, it is rivaled only by the Kangal.

This dog breed is reported to have a bite stronger than that of a lion. It can bite up to 700 psi (pounds per square inch), while a lion bites ‘only’ 650 psi!

As such, the Cane Corso is among the top three dogs when it comes to bite force.

What Is The Bite Force Of A Dogo Argentino?

Dogo Argentino is also a dog that is considered to have an extremely strong bite. In fact, its bite force is estimated to be around 500 psi, which is quite significant.

However, 500 psi is much weaker than the 700 psi Cane Corso dogs have – although it would be wise not to test this on yourself. 500 psi is more than enough to cause significant harm.

Just to compare, a human bite has a strength of 120–160 psi.

Who Wins?

big dog standing outside

Photo from: @dogoargentino.world

There are many things that people wonder about the Dogo Argentino vs. Cane Corso, especially as these two Mastiff breeds are so easily confused with one another.

Now that we’ve listed the differences, what could the verdict be?

It all depends on what it is you’re looking for!

If you’re looking to get a loyal guard dog, you can hardly go wrong with either of these two breeds. Both are extremely loyal and wary of strangers, which makes them alert you to any possible danger.

While both have a stubborn streak, they are very intelligent and trainable, so you’ll be able to teach them when to bark and when to just ignore newcomers.

If you’re looking at the size, this is where the Cane Corso wins – but only by a little. Both canines are large breeds of dogs that are easily recognized by their huge size and muscular bodies.

When it comes to strength, while both can overpower a human with ease, Cane Corso dogs are stronger, with a bite of 700 psi. In fact, they could probably win a fight with not just other strong dogs, such as the Doberman or Rottweiler, but also a lion!

With that in mind, it is only good fortune that somewhat weaker Dogo Argentino dogs are considered more aggressive, as there would be nothing worse than an aggressive Cane Corso!

If properly trained, both can make good service dogs, although Cane Corsos are known to have somewhat higher adaptability levels and a milder temperament.

As they have high energy levels and exercise needs, they are a great choice if you’re looking for a hiking partner. These are active dogs that would love to be with you during training.

However, if you’re looking for a family dog, it’s important to keep this in mind: These canines are not for everyone. They require experienced owners who know how to take good care of large dogs and how to properly train them.

In the end, it doesn’t really matter which one you choose when it comes to Dogo Argentino vs. Cane Corso. If you’re a good owner and buy from a reputable breeder, both can make great companions for life.

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