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What Is A Medium Goldendoodle? Mini Vs. Medium Vs. Standard Goldendoodles

What Is A Medium Goldendoodle? Mini Vs. Medium Vs. Standard Goldendoodles

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While there are many AKC-recognized breeds, hybrid breeds have grown in popularity in the last few years. English Goldendoodles are a perfect sign of this.

Before you adopt a new puppy, it’s essential to understand how big it’ll grow.

People who wrongly estimate their pup’s future size are usually the culprits behind a large number of abandoned dogs.

But is size easy to guess in hybrid dog breeds? How can you know whether you’ll get a mini Goldendoodle, a medium Goldendoodle, or a standard one?

Luckily, you’re in the right place to find out.

History And Temperament

goldendoodle portrait lying down in bed inside bedroom

While all hybrid breeds are relatively new, Goldendoodles are actually older than some official ones.

They were first made in 1960 by crossbreeding a Poodle and a Golden Retriever.

They were intended to be a larger alternative to the popular Cocker Spaniel and Poodle mix, the Cockapoo.

However, it wasn’t until the 1990s that this designer breed reached a wider audience and became a crowd favorite.

Despite this, most Goldendoodles you see today are first-generation, meaning their parents are a Poodle and a Retriever.

The same goes for many other widespread Poodle mixes, such as the Labradoodle (Labrador Retriever/Poodle crossbreed), Bernedoodle, Cockapoo, or Danoodle.

Goldendoodles were supposed to be simply a hypoallergenic substitute for the long-haired Retriever because you’re adding low-shedding Poodles to the gene pool. Still, they slowly became much more than that.

As they are friendly and affectionate, yet highly intelligent, they make fantastic therapy dogs and guide dogs.

They will offer emotional support to people who need it, and they’ll do it in an entirely natural way.

At the same time, thanks to their high activity level, size, and Retriever genes, they are excellent watchdogs, as well as scent-tracking dogs.

No matter the size of your Goldendoodle, you should keep them in a house with plenty of outdoor space so they can run around freely.

As they have high energy levels, it wouldn’t be wise to keep them locked in a small apartment or a kennel the entire day.

While overall friendly, Goldendoodles can sometimes be shy and skittish.

Because of this, it’s essential to train and socialize your Goldendoodle puppy from the moment he turns eight weeks old.

Goldendoodles are an extremely emotionally responsive breed, so make sure you have the time to dedicate to them.

All of this makes them great family pets, with a lifespan of 10 to 15 years.

Goldendoodle Size Range

goldendoodle dog outdoors sitting and relaxing looking at the camera

As is typical of hybrid breeds, Goldendoodles come in various different sizes. This isn’t a surprise since you can have miniature, medium, or standard Poodles.

This way, these dogs can accommodate their owner’s needs better.

Similar to their Poodle parent, Goldendoodles come in three regular sizes. This means we have:

•  Miniature Goldendoodle

•  Medium Goldendoodle

•  Standard Goldendoodle

Let’s take a more in-depth look!

The Miniature Goldendoodle

miniature goldendoodle sitting in the bench outdoors

The mini Goldendoodle is initially made by breeding a miniature Poodle with a Golden Retriever.

Typically, any Goldendoodle weighing less than 30 lbs is considered a mini Goldendoodle. Still, there are some sub-types of this breed, as well.

This is because there is a considerable size difference between a toy Poodle and a Golden Retriever, giving the breed a huge versatility when it comes to dimensions.

As a result, you can also get a teacup and a toy Goldendoodle, both smaller than a regular mini Goldendoodle.

Mini Goldendoodles were bred for dog owners who don’t have too much living space since more and more people opt for apartment living.

To ensure a Goldendoodle puppy’s small size, breeders will ensure they have a higher percentage of mini Poodle genes.

Because of this, most miniature Goldendoodles are F1b – they have one Goldendoodle and one Poodle parent.

In return, this also means that mini Goldendoodles don’t have much Golden Retriever blood in them.

Sadly, there isn’t much to be done about this. The first generation of puppies will remain unpredictable in size, and there might even be some health issues.

For dog owners who want to ensure their pup has plenty of Retriever in his heritage, they should opt for a standard Goldendoodle instead.

Personality-wise, mini Goldendoodles seem to be the closest to their owners. They are incredibly devoted, which is both a pro and a con.

While you’ll have a loyal pet who’ll follow you around the house all the time, you won’t have much personal space.

At the same time, miniature Goldendoodles shouldn’t be left alone for too long.

They are quick to get separation anxiety, so if you spend most of your day working in an office, this is probably not the dog for you.

If you often travel via plane, these pups might be the right choice. They are very portable and might even fit the carrier underneath the seat.

However, they won’t do well in cars since they are prone to motion sickness.

Their tiny size makes them an excellent choice for many families.

First and foremost, you can leave them with your child, knowing that they won’t knock him or her over accidentally.

Just make sure your kids know how to be gentle with such small dogs.

They are easy to control, and you can walk them on a leash without any issues at all. If they run into some trouble, you can pick them up with ease.

Their light weight also means you can easily carry them with you, whether it be up the stairs or in and out of the car.

Since they are small, they are reasonably cheap to own.

They eat small amounts of foods, they won’t need too much flea prevention, they’ll even shed less, and it’ll cost you next to nothing to get them to a professional groomer!

Despite this, if you find some miniature Goldendoodle puppies for sale, you should expect them to be very expensive.

In fact, the pricing is so high that some toy-sized Goldendoodles can cost around $4,000!

The downside of these dogs is that they won’t be able to keep up with you if you are an active person.

Long walks will tire smaller dogs out as they don’t have as much energy as most medium to large canines.

As they are F1b Goldendoodles, they’ll commonly exhibit the mini Poodle’s overly excitable personality, which some owners can find somewhat annoying.

This can make them too impatient for young kids.

Many mini Goldendoodles get scared easily, so kids’ sudden movements might frighten them and cause them to snap at your child.

Also, while they have low stamina, they are very energetic. This means they’ll require plenty of short-term exercise throughout the day.

Sadly, mini Goldendoodles tend to have many health issues, so always make sure you get them from a reputable breeder who knows the dog’s genetics.

The Standard Goldendoodle

tan standard goldendoodle standing outdoors

Standard Goldendoodles weigh 50 lbs or more. They’ll rarely be larger than 80 lbs, but their exact size depends on a dog’s specific parentage or the litter itself.

These Goldendoodles have the personality of a Golden Retriever. They are calm, patient, and gentle, and they’ll usually stay very tolerant of children.

Since Golden Retrievers and standard Poodles are similar in size, many breeders sell a first-generation cross.

There aren’t many variations in size. While you can never predict the exact characteristics, you’ll usually know what you’re getting into.

This is excellent for dog owners who want their Goldendoodle to have plenty of Golden Retriever lineage.

Keep in mind that a first-generation Goldendoodle might not be a great choice for allergy sufferers, as the coat type might still resemble that of a Golden Retriever.

Since both Poodle and Retriever are dog breeds that people commonly use as service dogs and in obedience competitions, they are excellent to train.

In fact, due to their calm nature, out of all Goldendoodle types, therapy dogs are mostly standard-sized.

They are also an excellent choice for dog owners who want their pets to protect their property.

While Goldendoodles don’t make exceptional guard dogs as they are friendly even towards strangers, a large dog will always make you feel safer.

When you have a big dog with a strong and deep bark, you feel more confident. An intruder who hears or sees a large canine won’t stop to try to pet him.

Goldendoodle sitting on chair

Photo from: @sweet_maple_doodle

Their size might also enable you to feel safe during walks, as you know most other dogs at the park won’t easily hurt them.

This is always a plus when you have a large dog on the opposite end of a leash.

However, their fairly big size has its disadvantages.

Traveling with a standard Goldendoodle can be challenging. They are large dogs that take up a lot of space.

You might not be able to drive with them in a tightly-packed car, and you’d need special permits to get on a plane with them.

Also, if you don’t train a standard Goldendoodle properly, you will end up with a big dog you can’t control.

You won’t be able to manage them on a leash, and you can’t just pick them up as you’d do with a mini or a medium Goldendoodle.

They can easily push and break furniture, and reaching food is no big deal for them. Not to mention how they can chew on chair legs or anything else they find interesting!

While they are a trainable breed, you still have to dedicate some time to socialize them. Otherwise, you’ll be left with a force to be reckoned with.

In fact, just like with most larger dogs, even a well-trained standard Goldendoodle can do some damage without wanting to. For example, its wagging tail will easily knock any glasses off a table.

Due to their size, they can easily knock a child over during playtime. While no one in their right mind would consider Goldendoodles dangerous, they can unintentionally do some harm.

Standard Goldendoodles need plenty of space to roam freely and stretch their legs. While they don’t have as much energy as smaller dogs, they still require daily exercise.

A good side of this is that you’re bound to lose some weight with a standard Goldendoodle and stay active!

The Medium Goldendoodle

goldendoodle with ball in the mouth playing

Medium Goldendoodles typically weigh around 30 and 50 lbs and seem to make a perfect middle-ground between mini and standard Goldendoodles.

They usually have the genetics of both miniature and standard Poodles, making their personality well-balanced.

Suppose you’re looking for a good family pet who is laid-back but who’ll stay at a manageable size at the same time. In that case, a medium Goldendoodle might be the dog you’re looking for.

They do great while traveling, as they are small enough to fit most vehicles while remaining calm. Due to their weight, they have higher centers of gravity, so they’ll seldom get carsickness, a common problem for many smaller dogs.

The medium Goldendoodle is still small enough for you to pick up in case of trouble while being able to withstand more challenging walks.

Of course, as their size can’t be precisely predicted, you can never be entirely confident in the future size of your puppy.

Typically though, a medium-sized female will stay smaller than a medium-sized male. If you don’t want your Goldendoodle to grow too large, you might want to get a female, just to make sure.

They are a fantastic compromise for active owners who cannot afford bigger dogs. Whether it is because of their small living space or the owner themself is fairly tiny, larger, standard Goldendoodles aren’t for everyone.

How Tall Will Your Goldendoodle Be?

mini goldendoodle puppy inside the wooden container outdoors

With hybrid breeds, you can never be entirely sure how big a dog will grow to be.

Overall, the best way to determine the size of the offspring is to look at the parents. The weight of the puppies is usually between the weights of the parent dogs.

Of course, this isn’t an absolute calculation. Sometimes, a pup will inherit more traits from just one parent.

A mini Poodle and a Golden Retriever might still result in a small-sized pooch.

Because of this, breeders usually mate two parents of a similar size, as this makes it easier to predict the weight of the litter.

As for which size would be the best for you, that is up to you to decide.

Can you deal with an overly energetic dog who is small in size, or would you rather take a large but calm pup?

For those who are indecisive, a medium Goldendoodle is the way to go. They are the best of both worlds.

Just be prepared! A medium Goldendoodle’s size can be unpredictable. You may end up with a much larger pup than you expected – or a much tinier one.

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